About your Search

20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16
be one of them. there are some estimates that we can be energy self-sufficient in the next 30, 40 years, so maybe that helps. this is a very complex issue. it has to be resolved. there has to be a happy medium there. whether or not it is because these ceos are boring abroad for certain things or not, that is up for debate. i'm certainly not one who will take a position on that because i don't know enough about it to make that call. there are a lot of very smart people out there, who we should respect, they are very good at what they do and they are still debating about what the proper solutions to this is. all right now, this is why we're seeing such a huge amount of debate going on in d.c. and in board rooms across the country. washington, d.c. host: there have been reports that secretary geithner will play a role in these talks. guest: the economic team is in place right now. this is obviously a very critical role for the administration and for the american people as a whole. with tim geithner, a lot of people have said he is one of the reasons why things are as shaky as they are righ
place. for seven years i have given 100% of my time, energy, and life to public service. however over the past several months, as my health hasdi tieror ated, my ability to serve the constituents of my district has continued to anyonish. against the recommendations of my doctors, i had hoped and tried to return to washington and continue working on the issues that matter most to the people of the second district. i now know that will not be possible. the constituents of the second district deserve a full-time legislator in washington, something i cannot be for the foreseeable future. my health issues and treatment regimen have become incompatible with service in the house of representatives. therefore it is with great regret that i hereby resign as a member of the united states house of representatives, effective today, in order to focus on restoring my health. during this journey, i have made my share of mistakes. i am aware of the ongoing federal investigation into my activities and am doing my best to address the situation respovensably, cooperate with the investigators and accept
on the moon, neil armstrong, just before 0:00. -- 11:00. next up, a discussion on u.s. energy policy and the energy grid. spotlighthis week's focus on the jeffrey leonard piece on the future of natural gas and the challenges of an aging electrical grid. jeffrey leonard, start with the first half of this equation and explain what you mean when you say that the natural gas boom could be the biggest game changer in global politics and economics in a generation. guest: things have changed so fast in the energy picture in the united states. a few years ago it seemed that we would need to import large amounts from abroad in order to meet our natural gas supply in this country. today there is so much gas available and more projected to become available in this country that it is creating opportunities for electricity generation for gas, creating opportunities for industries to go back to the united states. chemical, fertilizers, adding large amounts of money back into the economy. the energy picture looks a lot different than it did a few years ago. host: this natural gas boom that we have,
a little bit of energy into this thing and it becomes explosive. it is all energy driven. but the issue really is not that is what the emerging world with its -- whether it is time a court india up with different perspectives. i've seen china and india in 2004, maybe 2003, the trade was maybe $2 billion between the countries. today, i think this is where the chinese prime minister comes to india and we're talking $150 billion on the next verizon. this is without drawing claims. i think what asia is looking for is that we can have correlations within each other. without necessarily being aided to. it is a dangerous game, but all games are dangerous. kissinger credit a lifetime career out of it. [laughter] this is the way it is. military power is a dominant element of strategy will not work. as a background element of strategy, yes, it's essential, important, including for the first time two years ago, the pentagon had a conference i was there in which we discussed india and american cooperation in the pacific. never happened before. it does not mean [indiscernible] we are taking position
vacation in five years. it is time to restore my energy. the presidentand i were joking about how bad i looked. i said i thought he looked g reat. >> is it possible you will go into the white house. is i think my future outside the white house. becoming a part of whatyeever happens. >> it is possible you will run it on the outside? >> we need to have a conversation first. >> what is the horizon? >> you will want to see a d inaugural. the >> i do not thing -- we had disucssion with our people. it is lceal healthcare would not have pase d with out that. >> you were the first president since sdr to get 50% of the votwe twice. the country to talk to people. the truth is, the world had changed since 2008. all of those things have changed drastically. i went to see a lot of people and steven spielberg said to me, you have to blow up the 2008 campaign. you are on the the 1965 rolling stones once and then you charge too much for your ticket. it was an interesting way to think about that campaign. i said to the president i need you to promise me it is not going to be 2008 again. he said,
are ready to deal with that. now the challenge of energy security, and that is particularly true for the defense department. the ability of trying to improve our efficiency in moving from one area to another, you have got to be energy of fission, not to mention energy security with regards to larger security issues. we have got to implement this rebalance to the pacific, something i talked about on the trip i just took to the pacific. this is my fourth trip to the pacific to make clear we are going to continue to have a strong force projection in the pacific. it is important to our economic security and our national security to be able to do that in the future. in an edition, at the same time i have got a force deployed in trying to rebalance the pacific, i have got a significant presence in the middle east to deal with the threats in the middle east. i have a significant presence to deal with any potential threat we have to deal with in that region as well, and at the same time, with all of those challenges, we have to be able to take care of our service members and our veterans
" jack girard talks about gas prices and alternative energy efforts. christine owens discusses unemployment benefits. and after that, dominic chu discusses what wall street investors are doing with their money in advance of the fiscal cliff. "washington journal" live on tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. now, look at the role of private enterprise and public education and what the obama administration approach will be in 2013. this is an hour and 35 minutes. >> welcome. thank you for joining us. we are just getting back. the energy level is probably going to get mellow. we will make that work for us. today's panel is on the question of for-profit and federal education policy. this is a topic that we at aei have been talking about for an extended stretch. in support of the templeton foundation, we have been running the private enterprise projects, trying to think about the opportunities and the challenge. how do make this work for kids in the communities? how do we think about some of those challenges the potential perils? this panel is a close up series of panels and convers
. it is time to restore my energy. the president and i were joking about how bad i looked. it is time to take a vacation. >> what did you say about how he looks? >> i said i thought he looked great. [laughter] >> as a possible you will go into the white house? >> i have done that. i back to work on health care. i think my future is probably outside the white house helping him becoming part of whatever happens to our social movement to advocate for his agenda. >> it is up -- possible you would run about love for america on the outside. >> what we have to do first is have a discussion about what our people want to do. >> what is the horizon for making decisions about that? >> you will see us make decisions by the and not grow. that is natural. that is what we did last time. last time everybody thought we were going to do one thing. i do not think on election day we expect it to do that but we had discussions with our people and ended up doing that. it is clear healthcare would not have passed without that decision. >> the amazing thing the obama campaign has done, you were the first presidentia
available to the energy sector. we have spent to bring that together, we spent more in one year with the oil and gas and energy companies and their industry than we have spent in the entire life of the program of amtrak. clearly there seems to be an imbalance and it's not one that should be continued. regarding the vision of high speed rail, the amtrak excela service is one of those alternatives and know it may only achieve the speeds of average of 83 miles per hour, along the n.e.c., surely that is significantly better than the long delays in crawling engagor interstate systems that we have. this committee should continue the role as it always has to facilitate the development of critical infrastructure and the continuation of one of america's greatest assets, and that's passenger rail. i want to thank all the witnesses before the committee today. and i look forward to hearing your testimony about how the reorganization of amtrak can make it an even greater service to the american public. with that i yield back. >> i thank the gentlelady. recognize mrs. napolitano. >> thank you, mr. chairma
of the department of education, get rid of the department of energy or whatever. no, reform government so it costs less. 100,000 kids in arizona will now have a $5,000 voucher, they can take to a public school, a private school, a parochial school, home school, if they don't spend it -- >> so you're saying -- >> you don't need more money, you need reforms. we've given the post office -- would allowing fedex and u.p.s. to deliver mail make your post office mail get their sooner? >> this is one of the questions on the card. when you leave here very shortly you're going to go to your wednesday meeting. this is a literal meeting of the right wing conspiracy, right? >> about this size. >> this is a weekly meeting that you've had -- >> some of the people from there are here. [laughter] i see you. >> so this is a weekly meeting of what you call the center right coalition. you have similar meetings, 60 of them, in 48 states, around the country. and this is a place where members of congress, people from think tanks, people who generally agree get together to kind of open mike, there's 150 people, sometimes
passed a comprehensive energy plan off the floor of this house. protected social security, advanced so many other issues. a in my opinion, tip o'neill was the elder -- was the albert einstein of politics. he knew what it took in order to make this institution work. he knew what it took to reach across the aisle, to find people of good will, to make this chamber work and to advance the agenda for this country. so for for me, it's a great honor to be here because buildings, as we name them, also embody that person. it is my hope that as people walk in and out of this building for the 21st century, that they think about who tip o'neill was. they think about, yes, how much he loved political war, but at the same time he brought his own personal warmth to that, that it was not separated here on the house floor. it is my hope in naming this building perhaps this process this great institution, can be an nated by his great legacy and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves his time. >> mr. speaker, i reser
and the windfall. we have a path to energy independence. that is a bridge to renewable energy. if we can move to dass, we get tremendous benefits -- if we can move to gas, we can get tremendous and benefits. we have not been able to act on these things. >> let me jump to doug and steve and try to poke holes in this in a second. if we roll back time to just before the financial crisis, doug was out there bitching about already, but it is much worse. we are back to 156% of gdp. you are still in crisis mode. you have a private sector and events that led to a government response and a worsening of debt issues, so my question is why is it never on this list to get the private sector in control? there is nothing here saying we need to bring that down, so it is a question i want to ask you. the question is, if you think about restoring the u.s. economy and the u.s. consumer, i do not know where you get a growth if you leave the private suite where it is now. >> we try to get the transparency on the balance sheets. we have done dodd-frank. that takes care of making sure it does not fall apart. >> no
that are closed with their communication. i am not a spy. tell us. energy making sure facebook is available. we spend a ton of time on infrastructure and hiring people to make sure that you can get to that news feed. when it comes to governments -- there is not a lot we can do. it is interesting that young people -- i had a friend who people use technology. one of the things he observed is the way he put it is the average 18-year-old knows every last detail of how bluetooth works on their phone, all the internet and facebook, the ins and outs of twitter, how to change your can message you. every last detail their understood. when he asked them to are you afraid of the government finding it, they would say they do not understand how this stuff works. it was a message that -- in places where people do need an outlet or way of communicating that is not necessarily available in the public domain. animal. >> we have written about this issue on the security side. one of the worst things that happened, people log in and the government puts middleware in their password. if you do that that is the issue
listing the entire energy sector. what do each of you think what effect that might have and in particular how might that effect the international coalition that's negotiating with the iranians and also participating in the u.n. security council imposed sanctions? because part of the success i think over the last couple of three years is that there does appear to be greater unity amongst the p-5 plus one about the approach. so how might that affect the dynamics here if congress were to go forward? >> may i have the question? i hope it is wrong but removing the congress and try to block i would say nongovernmental dialogue, you know. it's destructive and harmful approach. catastrophe, i would say, if it's implemented. maybe it's a typical -- >> i think what you said earlier, rolf, was so important about the iraq experience and the madeline albright. you said we sanctioned a country. they sort of do what we want them to do and then someone announces, it doesn't matter what you do because we'll keep the sanctions regardless and the thing falls apart. that's the situation i fear with the u.s.
of what i've been looking for for cease-fire. at the u.n. secretary-general have put energy behind this. egypt is playing a strong role. the visit of secretary clinton will bolster that, and all of us in the e.u. countries also determined to do so. so a lot of effort is being made behind this cease-fire proposal. >> cannot press the foreign cretary to say something more about what the future conversations he had with his fellow e.u. ministers on gaza, and also what conversation she's having with the special representatives of egypt's? >> well, we have the whole e.u. a fair council meeting yesterday, and there were the conclusions published from that, calling and very much in line with what i've said to the house in terms of the need to end rocket attacks on issue but also as a support for a negotiated caesar. so the whole of the e.u. year and spoke together on that yesterday. of course, we also regulate discuss matters with tony blair, e envoy of the quartet to the palestinians. i most recently spoke to him 10 days, nine days ago about this. my colleagues are in constant touch with him,
it is energy, money, time, associated with every component of our educational institution. given this reality, every component has to be evaluated based on what is the return on investment of educational dollars, including football. so how do you do that? you have got to go to the justifications we have been using for a century for football's place with an educational institutions. we have to be honest, the primary justification was to socialize and immigrant workforce. the other part of it is the great industrialists at the turn of the century were introduced to football as a way to train a workforce for the industrial economy. they wanted folks who were physically fit, took directions, were obedient. there was not much room for lofty thinking on the assembly line. have to ask the question, is as a primary justification we are trying to instill in our schools for an industrial economy? we no longer live in an industrial society. and the other justification we have used for years -- and i do believe this justification -- is that football is an educational tool. it builds character, discipline
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)